Australian Open 2018

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Seventeen-year-old Destanee Aiava (Narre Warren, Vic) and 18-year-old Alex De Minaur (Sydney, NSW) have been awarded Australian Open 2018 wildcards after winning the AO Play-off finals in Melbourne today.
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Good opurtunity to youngsters
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Mats Wilander's Australian Open preview

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Ahead of the first Grand Slam of the year, Pinnacle’s new Brand Ambassador Mats Wilander has put his thoughts on what might happen in the men’s and women’s singles tournament into an article. What should you consider when trying the pick the winner of this year’s Australian Open? Read on to find out.

What to make of potential absences

Injuries have plagued both the men’s and women’s game for the last few Grand Slams at least. While some of the big names will be missed in terms of the tournament as a spectacle, it also makes picking the winner a real challenge.

Roger Federer is the only one of the Big Four with no real health concerns and it’s no surprise to see him as a popular pick for the men’s singles title. There might be doubts over how ready Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal will be if they do compete, but I can tell you that no professional will play in the tournament unless they feel they are well prepared.

The fact that Federer won the event last year will have played some part in making him most people’s choice for the title this time around but it also means there will be a lot more pressure on him to perform. While the media and fans always put pressure on him, the chance to repeat his success means he’ll be even more desperate to win.

Has injury opened the door for a new star?

Alexander Zverev and Nick Kyrgios are two guys that are on the fringes of breaking into that elite level at the top of the rankings. They might be part of the discussion when it comes to the big name players, but they’ve got a way to go yet.

The mental capacity of Kyrgios is often questioned. You can’t really argue against his critics after he folded under the pressure numerous times last season and appeared to lack commitment to his game. However, the talent is certainly there and if he’s going to win a slam in the near future it will most likely be the Australian Open.

Whether or not the fact that it’s his home court means that much to him is up for debate, but the hard court surface in Melbourne lends itself to his big serve and great hands. Grass is probably his best surface but the No. 17 ranked 22-year-old should definitely be given a chance.

What to think about ahead of the first Grand Slam of the year

Any real tennis fan will know the Australian Open is often referred to as the Happy Slam - this is because all the players are raring to go and optimistic that it could be their year to win a major or add another trophy to their collection.

Players who had a great end to the season last year will be full of confidence heading into the first big event of the year and those who didn’t perform so well will have put the hours in during the offseason and will be determined to improve.

Because the Australian Open is the first Grand Slam of the year there is very little form to go on. A word of warning would be to not read too much into the early rounds when it comes to analysing performance - the gap in quality between some of the top-seeded players and their opponents in the early rounds means their performance might look a lot more impressive than it actually is.

Why the weather and court conditions will play a part


I’m sure most tennis fans will be aware of it, but the weather can have a massive influence on how players perform - especially at the Australian Open. The drastic changes in temperature in Melbourne (it can drop from 100°F in the day to 65-70°F later in the evening) are important because different styles are suited to different temperatures.

In short, hot weather makes the ball bouncier and livelier meaning it spins more and travels through the air faster, suiting those who put plenty of spin on the ball and like to play the game at a fast pace. The colder it is, the easier the ball is to read – this is more suited to big servers as the ball will skid through off the surface.

The weather makes it hard to distinguish which style of play is suited to the hard court in Melbourne and it’s probably why most people believe the Australian Open is the “fairest” of all the slams. There might not be much you can do if you’re trying to pick the winner at the start of the tournament (the weather forecast can only tell you so much) but it’s definitely worth considering when looking at individual matches.

What to make of the Women’s Australian Open singles tournament

As is so often the case with the women, there are plenty of options to consider when trying to pick the winner of the singles tournament. The shorter format makes it incredibly unpredictable but there are a few contenders that stand out from the others.

The experience of winning a major (and the confidence that comes with it) is certainly a major plus for Garbine Muguruza. She’s burst onto the scene in the last couple of years and having already won the French Open (2016) and Wimbledon (2017), it won’t be long before she adds the Australian Open to her collection.

Maria Sharapova is another big name that everyone is going to be talking about during the tournament. Now back in the game after her 15-month ban, she’ll be full of passion and desire to prove a point. She’s won each of the four Grand Slams at least once (the French Open twice) and is a real talent that looks to be getting back to her best.

In contrast to Muguruza, Simona Halep is still on the hunt for her first Grand Slam title (despite being ranked No. 1 in the world). The Romanian hasn’t struggled in terms of consistency but the worry might be that she has lost both the major finals she’s played in (French Open 2014 and 2017).

pinnacle.com/en/betting-...9Z2YM9C8MWVUSBE?aup=True
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Very imformative!
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ausopen.com/draws - Draws are out!
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tennisclub wrote:

ausopen.com/draws - Draws are out!

Can we say goodbye to Stan? He can loose to Berankis for sure
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FOX wrote:

Can we say goodbye to Stan? He can loose to Berankis for sure

Stan can win, but we dont know if he will play..
Rafa and Roger have really nice draw they can reach final.
Djoko is questionable, but he can win few rounds
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FOX wrote:

Can we say goodbye to Stan? He can loose to Berankis for sure

These is a chance that Stan wouldn't play and for sure he isn't 100% ready at the moment. I would say pick Berankis or skip at all this match
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Federer still the man to beat at Melbourne Park

MELBOURNE: It might be argued that 36-year-old fathers of four have no business winning grand slam titles but try telling that to Roger Federer as the evergreen Swiss bids to claim a record-equalling sixth Australian Open crown in two weeks’ time. Federer will saddle up for a 19th time in the main draw at Melbourne Park, looking to frustrate ‘Generation Next’ once again and defend the title he won last year during a stunning comeback from knee surgery. No such queries hang over his fitness this year and if bookmakers are to be believed the other 127 men in the draw will be fighting for the scraps from Federer’s plate. On immediate form, few could argue.

Federer, seeded second, arrives for a first round match against mid-ranked Slovenian Aljaz Bedene after cruising through an undefeated run at the Hopman Cup. His major rivals, meanwhile, are either carrying injuries or returning from them, or in the case of ‘Big Four’ cohort Andy Murray, ruled out because of them. A magical 20th slam might seem a formality for a player who did it all in last year’s tournament with the shortest of run-ups, but on closer inspection, Federer’s path through the draw is far from straightforward.

Danger lurks at almost every corner, with former Wimbledon finalist Milos Raonic and a resurgent Juan Martin Del Potro, the man who beat Federer for the 2009 U.S. Open title, looming as threats before the quarter-finals. Yet few would be surprised if the tournament ends in a repeat of last year’s final with Federer up against his great Spanish rival and top seed Rafa Nadal. The pair split the four grand slam trophies between them last year, with Nadal, at 31, finishing the season as the ATP rankings’ oldest world number one.

Fit and firing: Like Federer, Nadal has pared back his playing schedule to prolong his career but the strain still showed when he pulled out of the ATP Tour Finals in November with a knee problem after losing his opening match. He missed warmup events in Abu Dhabi and Brisbane but appeared untroubled in an exhibition match win over Austrian world number five Dominic Thiem at Melbourne Park on Friday. If fit and firing, 2009 champion Nadal will be hard to beat but needs to bring something new to the court if he ends up facing Federer, who won all four of their matches last year. The Melbourne crowds will throw their support behind the two grand slam titans but the younger generation of players probably wish they would just go away. Year after year the bright sparks and ‘Next Big Things’ have been denied by the ‘Big Four’ at the slams. Even with Murray and Novak Djokovic out of the frame for much of 2017 due to injury, ‘Gen Next’ once again failed to make inroads at the four tournaments that really count.

Most bookmakers see third seed Grigor Dimitrov as the best chance among them to make a breakthrough in Melbourne, but still rate the Bulgarian lower than Djokovic, who brings a major query over his serving elbow, is seeded 14th and has barely swung a racquet in six months. While Melbourne Park maestro Djokovic will bid for a record seventh Australian Open title, those fans hoping for a shake-up of the establishment may look to 20-year-old Alexander Zverev after his stellar 2017.

Like 22-year-old Australian Nick Kyrgios, fourth seed Zverev possesses a majestic game capable of toppling the very best but also has a propensity to crumble on the biggest stages. Grand slam success is seen as a matter of when, not if, for Zverev but the ageless Federer stands ready to thwart another youth-led insurrection.

dailytimes.com.pk/179772...man-beat-melbourne-park/
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Thanks Benzema
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Australian Open 2018 is just about to start. Begining with the first round, swiss Stan Wawrinka faces ambitious lithuanian Ricardas Berankis – match starts on January 16, at 1:00 am. It is going to be the first match between these players.

First, for no instant assumptions to be made, let’s analyze both players.

Ricardas Berankis (ATP 138) – a 27-year-old, still fast long rally hitter. He has a strong and stable forehand and despite his height (1,75 m) hits quite rapid serves. Also, statistics show that the Lithuanian performs well on hard court, especially when it comes to Australian Open – here he has reached his furthest round in Grand Slam tournaments (3rd round, 2011 & 2013). Although now his rank doesn’t seem to scare his opponent, this player has very good chances to at least take a set.

Stan Wawrinka (ATP 9) – a slightly older (32-year-old) member of tennis elite, champion of 3 Grand Slam titles and still a fascinating performer on-court. Possessing one of the strongest one-handed backhands on tour, Stan Wawrinka tends to play more behind the baseline. Also, fast and accurate serves give opportunities to kill the opponent with a strong volley. There’s no doubt – a swiss has frightening statistics when it comes to his career goals he had already achieved, but looking at the present we could agree that he isn’t at his best form. Due to injury, Stan hadn’t played a single match since Wimbledon 2017, besides, he didn’t play any pre-tournaments on hard court before the Grand Slam.

So, at the forst glance, Stan Wawrinka might seem to have all the odds in his favor, but knowing his current on-court activity, it is quite obvious that the upcoming match is a perfect opportunity for Ricardas Berankis to fulfill his ambitions.

In my opinion, it is hard to guess the winner, but match might be quite long, Berankis will take at least one set
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We have youngest player ever to compete at grandslam - 15 years old only tennisworldusa.org/tenni...r.it&utm_medium=facebook
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Good review thanks
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Australian Open 2018 is just about to start. Begining with the first round, German Brown Dustin faces ambitious and hard working Portugese Sousa Joao– match starts on January 15, at 1:00 am. It is going to be the 4 between these players.

First, for no instant assumptions to be made, let’s analyze both players.

Dustin Brown (ATP 126) - German tennis player who is for sure best for watching and he always tennis spectacular in many ways. Still when it come to Grand Slams he is very concentrated and motivated, without ranking he made here thru the Qualies round. Dustin have superb serve (First and second is almost 200km/h), he play very fast tennis, his hits are very fast and makes a lot of trouble for all.

The cons of his play is unstable tennis and his minds on court, he always makes wrong decision...

Sousa Joao (ATP 59) - Player from Portugal often prefers clay surface, but he still feels pretty comfortable on all surfaces like hard, indoors hards or grass. He is very hard working player and always making problems for all oponents, 3 set's in match is his speciality. Sousa can hit decent serve, hit some good forehands, but his strategy is long rallies and creating opurtunity to win point.

In the end - Both players are same in many ways, they both taller players, have own strategy, can hit solid forehands and backhands, they like to trick opponents. I think this match will end in 4-5 set's for sure.
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Did you saw what happened today? that why i like AO. - 15 years old Marta Kostyuk won again
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Nice bet with Brown, Tennisclub! Good job
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What a play by Marta Kostyuk... amazing just 15 years old
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What a match Wawa - Berankis!
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